Agatha Christie Archive Launched

Posted in Agatha Christie with tags on September 12, 2010 by Melita M. Pereira

The BBC has launched the Agatha Christie Archive, an online archive featuring interviews, tributes and Christie-related news.

In one interview, recorded on 13 February 1955, Christie divulges secrets for how to write a best-selling novel. She tells listeners what first inspired her to start writing explaining that “there is nothing like boredom to make you write”. The Mysterious Affair at Styles was the first novel written by Christie to be accepted for publication. It was completed by the age of 21.

I was very interested to learn that Christie claims to have no specific writing method. She explains that the “real work [of crime writing] is done [by] thinking out the development of your story and worrying about it until it comes right”. Following this, Christie suggests that three months ought to be enough time to write a book. In contrast to novels, Christie explains that plays are better written quickly. I wish I had Christie’s concept of time!

In the digital age, where fiction enthusiasts have access to many interviews with modern writers, it is nice to be able to be able to listen to interviews and sound bites by authors such as Agatha Christie and listen to the press which these writers attracted as a result of their publishing success.

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Reading Jeffery Deaver’s ‘The Bone Collector’

Posted in Jeffery Deaver, The Bone Collector on September 9, 2010 by Melita M. Pereira

As I was leaving the house today to run an errand I noticed with great excitement that a package I had been expecting from Amazon was finally at my doorstep. Why it was simply slumped on my doorstep without my having to sign for it is a cause for wonderment, but I soon forgot all about it when I opened the package to finally have The Bone Collector in my hot little hands.

I am very excited to read this book. In The Bone Collector, Jeffery Deaver introduces readers to a very unique and fascinating character in the form of Lincoln Rhyme. First published in April 1998, the book was adapted into a film of the same name starring Denzel Washington and Angelina Jolie. I recently re-watched The Bone Collector. It was interesting to watch the film now that I am composing my own crime novel. What really struck me was the depth and dynamics of the relationship between Rhyme and detective Amelia Sachs. I believe that this relationship, its ebb and flow, is part of the momentum that makes The Bone Collector such a successful narrative. As I read through the book, I will be taking particular interest in the character development that punctuates this relationship and that dialogue that gives it such a memorable flare.

Every blog starts somewhere and The Hundred Blog just made its maiden voyage with this very short post about the advantages of reading The Bone Collector. There will be many more posts to follow this one, but in terms of crime fiction and crime writing, The Bone Collector is a fairly decent book to which this blog can set sail.